Changeless (The Parasol Protectorate #2): Gail Carriger

Alexia Tarabotti is back! Now married to Conall Maccon, Alpha of the Woolsey pack, and promoted to Muh Jah on the Shadow Council for the Queen of England, life is busier than ever. All of the military regiments overseas have returned to England–and there’s at least one setting up camp on her front lawn–and there’s a rather peculiar force turning all members of the supernatural set human, at least in a particular area. When that space begins to move northward toward Scotland, following her husband, Alexia decides to follow him via dirigible. Forced into travelling with escorts, Alexia is joined by her French maid Angelique, her husband’s claviger Tunstell (who is entirely in love with her friend Ivy Hisselpenny), her antagonistic half-sister Felicity–who is particularly angsty as the youngest sister is in the throes of planning her marriage, and–not to be outdone–her close friend Ivy Hisselpenny, who is newly engaged to one Captain Featherstonehaugh (but kind of irrevocably in love with Tunstell).

Before she leaves, however, she meets one particularly interesting French woman by the name of Madame Lefoux, who daylights as a hatmaker, but is a brilliant inventor behind closed doors, and was commissioned by Conall to make her one helluva parasol… that does everything but function as a parasol.

What’s most interesting about Madame Lefoux is that she dresses in men’s clothing, tailored to fit and accentuate her female body. She wears pants and waistcoats and cravats and the whole bit. It’s glorious, if a bit scandalous. There are also some indications that she may be bisexual, as there is an interesting sexual/romantic tension between her and Alexia, and this all makes a very interesting commentary on sexuality and power in [modified] Victorian society.

On the dirigible, it becomes apparent that somebody is trying rather hard to rid England of Alexia, first by poisoning her food (which unfortunately affects Tunstell instead) and then by pushing her off the edge of the deck and apparently wrestling with Madame Lefoux. Alexia saves herself on the side of the beast, however, and makes it back to safety no worse for wear.

Once in Scotland, the group meets up with her husband and travels to Kingair Castle, where they are met with a surly, unattractive woman who is introduced as Conall’s great-great-granddaughter. Alexia doesn’t take too kindly to the sudden realization that her husband had been married once before and never told her. Frankly, I can’t blame her.

While in Kingair, at least as many issues arise as are solved. The source of the humanizing agent turns out to be a mummy brought back from Egypt. The individual ransacking Alexia’s room and trying to kill her is her French maid, who had at some point in her past–surprise!–been romantically involved with Madame Lefoux.

But the real kicker to this book is the ending. And I’m telling you, I got so mad I fumed. I almost threw my book, and I don’t throw books.
Alexia is pregnant. Surprise of the ages, since, theoretically, supernaturals are incapable of producing offspring. But despite the fact that Alexia couldn’t possibly have slept with anyone else and certainly wouldn’t lie about it, her bloody husband flips out and starts swearing at her in front of everybody until she and Madame Lefoux leave for London.

Now. Believe me. I understand that it looks bad. And Conall is emotional (at best). But this was simply uncalled for. He married a preternatural, which had never been done before, so I don’t know why he couldn’t believe that the union would be capable of producing something no one ever had before: a baby.

Before I muck this up be including stuff from book 3, which I’ve already finished, I’m going to stop and leave you. This was supposed to have posted well over a month ago, and I’m dreadfully sorry that I never caught it. Because that means this isn’t everything it could have been and I suck. Sad face.

But, such as it is, it could be worse. So I’ll leave you here and return to you as swiftly as possible.

Adeu, my dears. Until next time.